Reflections

Blog for today
Devin

Frozen Buddha

I took this picture years ago, with a chuckle, in a moment of appreciating the equanimity of Buddha no matter what is happening.  Coming across it again during our challenging midwinter cold, I thought about the teaching that one way of reaching equanimity is by viewing our thoughts the same way we view weather.  We all notice the weather. And at the same time, we all know there is no “forever weather.”  Weather, is simply passing by.  Impermanent and impersonal.  What would happen if we could view our thoughts this way? Pema Chodron has one of the most often quoted

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Blog for today
Kim

The Joy of Generosity

Our sangha had the pleasure of participating in the Buddhist Global Relief fundraiser to help alleviate world hunger today. Buddhist Global Relief | Worldwide relief funded by a Buddhist organization Our local event was a walk at Look Park, and was a wonderful opportunity to focus on generosity (dana), and sending loving kindness to all in need. https://rivervalleyinsight.org/retreats-and-special-events/ Darla and I are pictured here enjoying the fall foliage in the park. The Buddha emphasized the importance of generosity in freeing ourselves from suffering, and the positive mind states it engenders. “Generosity brings happiness at every stage of its expression. We

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Blog for today
Devin

The Effects of Our Actions

by Cheryl Wilfong, Guest Blogger I bought a pale yellow datura in the spring. Since the summer was hot and dry, not much happened, but now that it’s cool and dry, the Georgia O’Keefe flower is blooming. I’ve grown the lavender daturas (a.k.a. jimsonweed) before and sworn off the thorny seed pod because next year, datura pops up in several places. Mostly, i weed out the little seedlings, but this year i kept one lavender datura out in the vegetable garden.  Like the scattering of datura seeds, we never know how the effects of our actions ripple out, but ripple

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Blog for today
Kim

Awareness and Sati

Mindfulness is central in the teachings of the Buddha. It is an important mental factor in many areas of practice. However, we may confuse mindfulness/sati with attention in our practice. We focus on an object to the exclusion of everything else, and it seems like we are “being mindful”. Unfortunately, this can feel tight and uncomfortable. But, the analogies that the Buddha used shows that sati is more than attention. Sati is like a guard at the gate of the city who has a broad view of what is happening. “Just as a royal frontier fortress has a gatekeeper—wise, experienced,

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